Introducing The Law Community, the online community just for Clio customers. Sign up now.

Unable to Edit Contact's Clio Connect Email Address Even Though There Is Only One Active Clio Connect Account Used by Them

Question:

  • Why can I not edit my contact's primary Clio Connect email address? The box is currently greyed out.
  • The knowledge center article said that the Clio Connect account would be editable unless the contact has more than one active Clio Connect Account. My client confirmed this, so why can I not edit their email address?

Environment:

  • Clio Manage

Additional Information:

  • Please note that deleting a Contact will also disable any Clio Connect account associated with that Contact's email. If you wish to preserve the documents shared with this contact, please contact Clio Support, and they'd be able to help with this.

Answer:

In this case, you will need to delete the contact and recreate the contact with the new email address that will be used to share Clio Connect information.

Deleting the contact will remove all matters that belong to them and any associated matters as well.  Those matters would then need to be edited to include the newly created contact.

• To delete a contact, please follow these steps:

  1. Open the Contact 
  2. Select Edit 
  3. Click on Delete Contact at the bottom-right
  4. Check the box "I confirm that I understand the consequences of this action."
  5. Click Delete Contact

• To create a new contact, please follow these steps:

  1. Click Contacts
  2. Click New Person 
  3. Enter First and Last Names
  4. Enter in the Clio Connect email that you wish to use 
  5. Click Save

• To add a contact as a related contact (if needed), please follow these steps:

  1. Locate the Matter in question
  2. Click Edit matter
  3. Scroll down to Related Contact
  4. Enter the relevant information
  5. Click Save Matter

 

 

 

 

Was this article helpful?
This information is confusing or wrong
This isn't the information that I was looking for
I don't like this functionality